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Decreasing Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Failure in Preterm Infants

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Many preterm infants stabilized on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) at birth require mechanical ventilation (MV) during the first 72 hours of life, which is defined as CPAP failure. Our objective was to decrease CPAP failure in infants ≤29 weeks’ gestational age (GA).

METHODS

A quality improvement bundle named OPTISURF was implemented for infants ≤29 weeks’ GA admitted on CPAP, consisting of stepwise escalation of CPAP and less invasive surfactant administration guided by fractional inspired oxygen concentration ≥0.3. The CPAP failure rate was tracked by using control charts. We compared practice and outcomes of a pre–OPTISURF cohort (January 2017 to September 2018) to a post-OPTISURF cohort (October 2018 to December 2019).

RESULTS

Of the 216 infants ≤29 weeks’ GA admitted to NICU on CPAP, 125 infants belonged to the pre-OPTISURF cohort (OSC) and 91 to the post-OSC. Compared with the pre-OSC, a higher proportion of infants in the post-OSC received CPAP 7 cm H2O within 4 hours of life (7% vs 32%; P < .01). The post-OSC also had lower rates of CPAP failure (54% vs 11%; P < .01), pneumothoraces (8% vs 1%; P < .03), need for MV (58% vs 31%; P < .01), and patent ductus arteriosus treatment (21% vs 9%; P = .02). Additionally, in a subgroup analysis, CPAP failure was lower in the post-OSC among infants 23 to 26 weeks (79% vs 27%; P < .01) and 27 to 29 weeks’ GA (46% vs 3%; P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS

Implementation of a quality improvement bundle including CPAP optimization and less invasive surfactant administration decreased CPAP failure and need for MV in preterm infants.

Optimizing Situation Awareness to Reduce Emergency Transfers in Hospitalized Children

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Interventions to improve care team situation awareness (SA) are associated with reduced rates of unrecognized clinical deterioration in hospitalized children. By addressing themes from recent safety events and emerging corruptors to SA in our system, we aimed to decrease emergency transfers (ETs) to the ICU by 50% over 10 months.

METHODS

An interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and families convened to improve the original SA model for clinical deterioration and address communication inadequacies and evolving technology in our inpatient system. The key drivers included the establishment of a shared mental model, psychologically safe escalation, and efficient and effective SA tools. Novel interventions including the intentional inclusion of families and the interdisciplinary team in huddles, a mental model checklist, door signage, and an electronic health record SA navigator were evaluated via a time series analysis. Sequential inpatient-wide testing of the model allowed for iteration and consensus building across care teams and families. The primary outcome measure was ETs, defined as any ICU transfer in which the patient receives intubation, inotropes, or ≥3 fluid boluses within 1 hour.

RESULTS

The rate of ETs per 10 000 patient-days decreased from 1.34 to 0.41 during the study period. This coincided with special cause improvement in process measures, including risk recognition before medical response team activation and the use of tools to facilitate shared SA.

CONCLUSIONS

An innovative, proactive, and reliable process to predict, prevent, and respond to clinical deterioration was associated with a nearly 70% reduction in ETs.

Sexual Minority Status and Age of Onset of Adolescent Suicide Ideation and Behavior

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
OBJECTIVES

To determine if sexual minority adolescents have earlier onset of suicidality and faster progressions from ideation to plan and attempt than heterosexual adolescents.

METHODS

A population-based longitudinal cohort of 1771 adolescents participated in the NEXT Generation Health Study. Participants reported sexual minority status (defined by sexual attraction) in 2010–2011 and retrospectively reported age at onset of suicidality in 2015–2016.

RESULTS

Sexual minority adolescents (5.8% of weighted sample) had higher lifetime risk of suicide ideation (26.1% vs 13.0%), plan (16.6% vs 5.4%), and attempt (12.0% vs 5.4%) than heterosexual adolescents. Survival analyses adjusted for demographic characteristics and depressive symptoms revealed positive associations of sexual minority status with time to first onset of suicide ideation (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03–3.06) and plan (HR = 2.69; 95% CI 1.30–5.56). The association between sexual minority status and age at onset of suicide attempt was stronger at age <15 (HR = 3.26; 95% CI 1.25–8.47) than age ≥15 (HR = 0.59; 95% CI 0.21–1.66). The association between sexual minority status and progression from ideation to plan was stronger in the same year of first ideation (HR = 2.01; 95% CI 1.07–3.77) than ≥1 year after first ideation (HR = 1.33; 95% CI 0.26–6.77).

CONCLUSIONS

Sexual minority adolescents had earlier onset of suicidality and faster progression from suicide ideation to plan than heterosexual adolescents. The assessment of sexual minority status in routine pediatric care has the potential to inform suicide risk screening, management, and intervention efforts among early sexual minority adolescents.

Reducing Severe Tracheal Intubation Events Through an Individualized Airway Bundle

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
BACKGROUND

Neonatal tracheal intubation (TI) is a high-risk procedure associated with adverse safety events. In our newborn and infant ICU, we measure adverse tracheal intubation–associated events (TIAEs) as part of our participation in National Emergency Airway Registry for Neonates, a neonatal airway registry. We aimed to decrease overall TIAEs by 10% in 12 months.

METHODS

A quality improvement team developed an individualized approach to intubation using an Airway Bundle (AB) for patients at risk for TI. Plan-do-study-act cycles included AB creation, simulation, unit roll out, interprofessional education, team competitions, and adjusting AB location. Outcome measure was monthly rate of TIAEs (overall and severe). Process measures were AB initiation, AB use at intubation, video laryngoscope (VL) use, and paralytic use. Balancing measure was inadvertent administration of TI premedication. We used statistical process control charts.

RESULTS

Data collection from November 2016 to August 2020 included 1182 intubations. Monthly intubations ranged from 12 to 41. Initial overall TIAE rate was 0.093 per intubation encounter, increased to 0.172, and then decreased to 0.089. System stability improved over time. Severe TIAE rate decreased from 0.047 to 0.016 in June 2019. AB initiation improved from 70% to 90%, and AB use at intubation improved from 18% to 55%. VL use improved from 86% to 97%. Paralytic use was 83% and did not change. The balancing measure of inadvertent TI medication administration occurred once.

CONCLUSIONS

We demonstrated a significant decrease in the rate of severe TIAEs through the implementation of an AB. Next steps include increasing use of AB at intubation.

Pubertal Suppression, Bone Mass, and Body Composition in Youth With Gender Dysphoria

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Puberty onset and development contribute substantially to adolescents’ bone mass and body composition. Our objective with this study was to examine the effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) on these puberty-induced changes among youth with gender dysphoria (GD).

METHODS

Medical records of the endocrine diversity clinic in an academic children’s hospital were reviewed for youth with GD seen from January 2006 to April 2017 with at least 1 baseline dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry measurement.

RESULTS

At baseline, transgender females had lower lumbar spine (LS) and left total hip (LTH) areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and LS bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) z scores. Only 44.7% of transgender youth were vitamin D sufficient. Baseline vitamin D status was associated with LS, LTH aBMD, and LS BMAD z scores. Post-GnRHa assessments revealed a significant drop in LS and LTH aBMD z scores (transgender males and transgender females) without fractures and LS BMAD (transgender males), an increase in gynoid (fat percentage), and android (fat percentage) (transgender males and transgender females), and no changes in BMI z score.

CONCLUSIONS

GnRHa monotherapy negatively affected bone mineral density of youth with GD without evidence of fractures or changes in BMI z score. Transgender youth body fat redistribution (android versus gynoid) were in keeping with their affirmed gender. The majority of transgender youth had vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency with baseline status associated with bone mineral density. Vitamin D supplementation should be considered for all youth with GD.

SARS-CoV-2 Among Infants <90 Days of Age Admitted for Serious Bacterial Infection Evaluation

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
OBJECTIVES

To determine the prevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in infants hospitalized for a serious bacterial infection (SBI) evaluation and clinically characterize young infants with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

METHODS

A retrospective chart review was conducted on infants <90 days of age hospitalized for an SBI evaluation. The study was conducted at 4 inpatient facilities in New York City from March 15, 2020, to December 15, 2020.

RESULTS

We identified 148 SBI evaluation infants who met inclusion criteria. A total of 22 infants (15%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by nasopharyngeal reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction; 31% of infants admitted during periods of high community SARS-CoV-2 circulation tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, compared with 3% when community SARS-CoV-2 circulation was low (P < .001). The mean age of infants with SARS-CoV-2 was higher than that of SARS-CoV-2–negative infants (33 [SD: 17] days vs 23 [SD: 23] days, respectively; P = .03), although no age difference was observed when analysis was limited only to febrile infants. An isolated fever was the most common presentation of SARS-CoV-2 (n = 13; 59%). Admitted infants with SARS-CoV-2 were less likely to have positive urine culture results (n = 1 [5%] versus n = 25 [20%], respectively; P = .002), positive cerebrospinal culture results (n = 0 [0%] versus n = 5 [4%], respectively; P = .02), or be admitted to intensive care (n = 2 [9%] versus n = 47 [37%]; P < .001), compared with infants without SARS-CoV-2.

CONCLUSIONS

SARS-CoV-2 was common among young infants hospitalized for an SBI evaluation during periods of high but not low community SARS-CoV-2 circulation in New York City, although most infants did not require intensive care admission.

Emergency Department Pediatric Visits in Alberta for Cannabis After Legalization

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Canada legalized nonmedical cannabis possession and sale in October 2018. In the United States, state legalization has been tied to an increase in cannabis-related emergency department (ED) visits; however, little research exists on provincial changes in pediatric visits after nationwide legislation. We compared pre- and postlegalization trends in pediatric cannabis-related ED visits and presentation patterns in urban Alberta EDs.

METHODS

Retrospective National Ambulatory Care Reporting System data were queried for urban Alberta cannabis-related ED visits among patients aged <18 years from October 1, 2013, to February 29, 2020. Population subgroups included children (aged 0–11 years), younger adolescents (12 to 14 years), and older adolescents (15 to 17 years). We calculated interrupted time series, incident rate ratios (IRRs), and relative risk (RR) ratios to identify trend change. IRRs identified changes against growth-adjusted Alberta population, while RRs measured presentation pattern changes against prelegalization ED visits.

RESULTS

Pediatric visit volume did not change postlegalization when accounting for preexisting volume trends. Unintentional ingestions increased in children (IRR: 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42 to 2.20 and RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.47, respectively) and older adolescents (IRR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.07 to 1.71 and RR: 1.48, 95% CI: 1.21 to 1.81, respectively). Presentation patterns remained similar, although older adolescent co-ingestant use decreased (RR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.67 to 0.88), whereas hyperemesis cases increased (RR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.37).

CONCLUSIONS

Cannabis legalization has increased child and older adolescent unintentional cannabis ingestions, increasing child cannabis-related ED visits. Changes highlight need for public health interventions targeting pediatric exposures.

Comparative Effectiveness of Parent-Based Interventions to Support Injured Children

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
OBJECTIVES

A comparative effectiveness trial tested 2 parent-based interventions in improving the psychosocial recovery of hospitalized injured children: (1) Link for Injured Kids (Link), a program of psychological first aid in which parents are taught motivational interviewing and stress-screening skills, and (2) Trauma Education, based on an informational booklet about trauma and its impacts and resources.

METHODS

A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 4 children’s hospitals in the Midwestern United States. Children aged 10 to 17 years admitted for an unintentional injury and a parent were recruited and randomly assigned to Link or Trauma Education. Parents and children completed questionnaires at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months posthospitalization. Using an intent-to-treat analysis, changes in child-reported posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, quality of life, and child behaviors were compared between intervention groups.

RESULTS

Of 795 injured children, 314 children and their parents were enrolled into the study (40%). Link and Trauma Education was associated with improved symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, and pediatric quality of life at similar rates over time. However, unlike those in Trauma Education, children in the Link group had notable improvement of child emotional behaviors and mild improvement of conduct and peer behaviors. Compared with Trauma Education, Link was also associated with improved peer behaviors in rural children.

CONCLUSION

Although children in both programs had reduced posttrauma symptoms over time, Link children, whose parents were trained in communication and referral skills, exhibited a greater reduction in problem behaviors.

Reading Proficiency Trends Following Newborn Hearing Screening Implementation

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
OBJECTIVES

To investigate trends in population-level school-aged reading scores among students with hearing loss in an urban Colorado school district after implementation of universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) and Early Hearing Detection and Intervention.

METHODS

The final sample included 1422 assessments conducted during the 2000–2001 through 2013–2014 school years for 321 children with hearing loss in grades 3 through 10. Longitudinal hierarchical linear modeling analyses were used to examine reading proficiency (controlling for birth year, grade in school, free and reduced lunch status, additional disability services, and English not spoken in the home). The Colorado Student Assessment Program was administered to students in third through 10th grades throughout the state. The test years chosen included children born before and after implementation of UNHS.

RESULTS

After implementation of UNHS, significant longitudinal reading proficiency improvements were observed by birth year and grade overall and for all subgroups. However, gains in reading proficiency were substantially less for children eligible for free and reduced lunch and those with moderate-severe to profound hearing loss. With each succeeding birth cohort and grade, increased numbers of children participated in testing because of improved language skills, with higher proportions identified as proficient or advanced readers.

CONCLUSIONS

Notable improvements in reading proficiency after Early Hearing Detection and Intervention implementation were demonstrated, as all groups of children with hearing loss became more likely to achieve proficient and advanced reading levels. On the other hand, some disparities increased, with greater improvements in reading proficiency for children in economically advantaged families.

Newborn Pulse Oximetry for Infants Born Out-of-Hospital

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Conventional timing of newborn pulse oximetry screening is not ideal for infants born out-of-hospital. We implemented a newborn pulse oximetry screen to align with typical midwifery care and measure its efficacy at detecting critical congenital heart disease.

METHODS

Cohort study of expectant mothers and infants mainly from the Amish and Mennonite (Plain) communities with limited prenatal ultrasound use. Newborns were screened at 1 to 4 hours of life ("early screen") and 24 to 48 hours of life ("late screen"). Newborns were followed up to 6 weeks after delivery to report outcomes. Early screen, late screen, and combined results were analyzed on the basis of strict algorithm interpretation ("algorithm") and the midwife’s interpretation in the field ("field") because these did not correspond in all cases.

RESULTS

Pulse oximetry screening in 3019 newborns (85% Plain; 50% male; 43% with a prenatal ultrasound) detected critical congenital heart disease in 3 infants. Sensitivity of combined early and late screen was 66.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.4% to 99.2%) for algorithm interpretation and 100% (95% CI 29.2% to 100%) for field interpretation. Positive predictive value was similar for the field interpretation (8.8%; 95% CI 1.9% to 23.7%) and algorithm interpretation (5.4%; 95% CI 0.7% to 18.2%). False-positive rates were ≤1.2% for both algorithm and field interpretations. Other pathologies (noncritical congenital heart disease, pulmonary issues, or infection) were reported in 12 of the false-positive cases.

CONCLUSIONS

Newborn pulse oximetry can be adapted to the out-of-hospital setting without compromising sensitivity or prohibitively increasing false-positive rates.

Nature and Childrens Health: A Systematic Review

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
CONTEXT

Daily outdoor play is encouraged by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Existing evidence is unclear on the independent effect of nature exposures on child health.

OBJECTIVE

We systematically evaluated evidence regarding the relationship between nature contact and children’s health.

DATA SOURCES

The database search was conducted by using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsychInfo, ERIC, Scopus, and Web of Science in February 2021.

STUDY SELECTION

We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. In all searches, the first element included nature terms; the second included child health outcome terms.

DATA EXTRACTION

Of the 10 940 studies identified, 296 were included. Study quality and risk of bias were assessed.

RESULTS

The strongest evidence for type of nature exposure was residential green space studies (n = 147, 50%). The strongest evidence for the beneficial health effects of nature was for physical activity (n = 108, 32%) and cognitive, behavioral, or mental health (n = 85, 25%). Physical activity was objectively measured in 55% of studies, and 41% of the cognitive, behavioral, or mental health studies were experimental in design.

LIMITATIONS

Types of nature exposures and health outcomes and behaviors were heterogenous. Risk of selection bias was moderate to high for all studies. Most studies were cross-sectional (n = 204, 69%), limiting our ability to assess causality.

CONCLUSIONS

Current literature supports a positive relationship between nature contact and children’s health, especially for physical activity and mental health, both public health priorities. The evidence supports pediatricians in advocating for equitable nature contact for children in places where they live, play, and learn.

A Text-Based Intervention to Promote Literacy: An RCT

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Children entering kindergarten ready to learn are more likely to thrive. Inequitable access to high-quality, early educational settings creates early educational disparities. TipsByText, a text-message–based program for caregivers of young children, improves literacy of children in preschool, but efficacy for families without access to early childhood education was unknown.

METHODS

We conducted a randomized controlled trial with caregivers of 3- and 4-year-olds in 2 public pediatric clinics. Intervention caregivers received TipsByText 3 times a week for 7 months. At pre- and postintervention, we measured child literacy using the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening Tool (PALS-PreK) and caregiver involvement using the Parent Child Interactivity Scale (PCI). We estimated effects on PALS-PreK and PCI using multivariable linear regression.

RESULTS

We enrolled 644 families, excluding 263 because of preschool participation. Compared with excluded children, those included in the study had parents with lower income and educational attainment and who were more likely to be Spanish speaking. Three-quarters of enrollees completed pre- and postintervention assessments. Postintervention PALS-PreK scores revealed an unadjusted treatment effect of 0.260 (P = .040); adjusting for preintervention score, child age, and caregiver language, treatment effect was 0.209 (P = .016), equating to ~3 months of literacy gains. Effects were greater for firstborn children (0.282 vs 0.178), children in 2-parent families (0.262 vs 0.063), and 4-year-olds (0.436 vs 0.107). The overall effect on PCI was not significant (1.221, P = .124).

CONCLUSIONS

The health sector has unique access to difficult-to-reach young children. With this clinic-based texting intervention, we reached underresourced families and increased child literacy levels.

Antiviral Use in Canadian Children Hospitalized for Influenza

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
OBJECTIVES

Antivirals are recommended for children hospitalized with influenza but are underutilized. We describe antiviral prescribing during influenza admissions in Canadian pediatric centers and identify factors associated with antiviral use.

METHODS

We performed active surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations among children ≤16 years old at the 12 Canadian Immunization Monitoring Program Active hospitals, from 2010–2011 to 2018–2019. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with antiviral use.

RESULTS

Among 7545 patients, 57.4% were male; median age was 3 years (interquartile range: 1.1–6.3). Overall, 41.3% received antiviral agents; 72.8% received antibiotics. Antiviral use varied across sites (range, 10.2% to 81.1%) and influenza season (range, 19.9% to 59.6%) and was more frequent in children with ≥1 chronic health condition (52.7% vs 36.7%; P < .001). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with antiviral use included older age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02–1.05]), more recent season (highest aOR 9.18 [95% CI, 6.70–12.57] for 2018–2019), admission during peak influenza period (aOR 1.37 [95% CI, 1.19–1.58]), availability of local treatment guideline (aOR 1.54 [95% CI, 1.17–2.02]), timing of laboratory confirmation (highest aOR 2.67 [95% CI, 1.97–3.61] for result available before admission), presence of chronic health conditions (highest aOR 4.81 [95% CI, 3.61–6.40] for cancer), radiographically confirmed pneumonia (aOR 1.39 [95% CI, 1.20–1.60]), antibiotic treatment (aOR 1.51 [95% CI, 1.30–1.76]), respiratory support (1.57 [95% CI, 1.19–2.08]), and ICU admission (aOR 3.62 [95% CI, 2.88–4.56]).

CONCLUSIONS

Influenza antiviral agents were underused in Canadian pediatric hospitals, including among children with high-risk chronic health conditions. Prescribing varied considerably across sites, increased over time, and was associated with patient and hospital-level characteristics. Multifaceted hospital-based interventions are warranted to strengthen adherence to influenza treatment guidelines and antimicrobial stewardship practices.

Babys First Years: Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Poverty Reduction in the United States

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01

Childhood economic disadvantage is associated with lower cognitive and social-emotional skills, reduced educational attainment, and lower earnings in adulthood. Despite these robust correlations, it is unclear whether family income is the cause of differences observed between children growing up in poverty and their more fortunate peers or whether these differences are merely due to the many other aspects of family life that co-occur with poverty. Baby’s First Years is the first randomized controlled trial in the United States designed to identify the causal impact of poverty reduction on children’s early development. A total of 1000 low-income mothers of newborns were enrolled in the study and began receiving a monthly unconditional cash gift for the first several years of their children’s lives. Mothers were randomly assigned to receive either a large monthly cash gift or a nominal monthly cash gift. All monthly gifts are administered via debit card and can be freely spent with no restrictions. Baby’s First Years aims to answer whether poverty reduction in early childhood (1) improves children’s developmental outcomes and promotes healthier brain functioning, and (2) improves family functioning and better enables parents to support child development. Here we present the rationale and design of the study as well as potential implications for science and policy.

The Campaign for Universal Free Lunch in New York City: Lessons Learned

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01

The New York City (NYC) Department of Education is the largest public school system in the United States, with an enrollment of >1.1 million students. Students who participate in school meal programs can have higher dietary quality than nonparticipating students. Historically, family income documentation qualifying students in the NYC Department of Education for free or reduced-price meals reimbursed by the National School Lunch Program perpetuated poverty stigma. Additionally, National School Lunch Program qualification paperwork was a deterrent to many vulnerable families to participate and impeded all eligible children’s access to nutritious meals, potentially magnifying food insecurity. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 provided a viable option for schools to serve free meals to all students, regardless of income status, as a universal free lunch (UFL) through a Community Eligibility Provision if ≥40% of students already participated in another means-based program, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. In this case study, we describe the processes of (1) strategic coalition building of the Lunch 4 Learning campaign (a coalition of students, parents, school-based unions, teachers, pediatricians, community leaders, and children’s advocacy organizations) to bring UFL to all NYC public schools, (2) building political support, (3) developing a media strategy, and (4) using an evidence-based strategy to overcome political, administrative, and procedural challenges. The Lunch 4 Learning campaign successfully brought UFL to all NYC public schools in 2017. This case study informs further advocacy efforts to expand UFL in other school districts across the country and national UFL advocacy.

Factorial Analysis Quantifies the Effects of Pediatric Discharge Bundle on Hospital Readmission

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Factorial design of a natural experiment was used to quantify the benefit of individual and combined bundle elements from a 4-element discharge transition bundle (checklist, teach-back, handoff to outpatient providers, and postdischarge phone call) on 30-day readmission rates (RRs).

METHODS

A 24 factorial design matrix of 4 bundle element combinations was developed by using patient data (N = 7725) collected from January 2014 to December 2017 from 4 hospitals. Patients were classified into 3 clinical risk groups (CRGs): no chronic disease (CRG1), single chronic condition (CRG2), and complex chronic condition (CRG3). Estimated main effects of each bundle element and their interactions were evaluated by using Study-It software. Because of variation in subgroup size, important effects from the factorial analysis were determined by using weighted effect estimates.

RESULTS

RR in CRG1 was 3.5% (n = 4003), 4.1% in CRG2 (n = 1936), and 17.6% in CRG3 (n = 1786). Across the 3 CRGs, the number of subjects in the factorial groupings ranged from 16 to 674. The single most effective element in reducing RR was the checklist in CRG1 and CRG2 (reducing RR by 1.3% and 3.0%) and teach-back in CRG3 (by 4.7%) The combination of teach-back plus a checklist had the greatest effect on reducing RR in CRG3 by 5.3%.

CONCLUSIONS

The effect of bundle elements varied across risk groups, indicating that transition needs may vary on the basis of population. The combined use of teach-back plus a checklist had the greatest impact on reducing RR for medically complex patients.

Parenthood and Parental Leave Decisions in Pediatric Residency

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
OBJECTIVES

The demands of residency training may impact trainees’ decision to have children. We examined characteristics of pediatric residents’ decisions regarding childbearing, determinants of resident parental leave, and associations with well-being.

METHODS

A survey of 845 pediatric residents at 13 programs was conducted between October 2019 and May 2020. Survey items included demographics, desire for future children, and logistics of parental leave. Outcomes included parental leave length, burnout and depression screening results, satisfaction with duration of breastfeeding, and satisfaction with parental leave and parenthood decisions.

RESULTS

Seventy-six percent (639 of 845) of residents responded to the survey. Fifty-two percent (330) of respondents reported delaying having children during residency, and 29% (97) of those were dissatisfied with their decision to do so. Busy work schedule (89.7%), finances (50.9%), and a desire not to extend residency (41.2%) were the most common reasons for delay. Of respondents, 16% were parents and 4% were pregnant or had pregnant partners. Sixty-one parental leaves were reported, and 67% of parents reported dissatisfaction with leave length. The most frequently self-reported determinant of leave duration was the desire not to extend residency training (74%). Program mean leave length was negatively associated with burnout, measured as a dichotomous outcome (odds ratio = 0.81 [95% confidence interval 0.68–0.98]; P = .02).

CONCLUSIONS

Many pediatric trainees delay parenthood during residency and are not satisfied with their decision to do so. Pediatric resident parental leave remains short and variable in duration, despite the positive association between longer leaves and overall well-being.

Gender Dysphoria and Chronic Pain in Youth

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01

Chronic pain in youth with gender dysphoria (GD) is poorly understood. The aim of our study was to review the clinical presentation of 8 youth with GD in a multidisciplinary chronic pain clinic. A single center retrospective chart review was conducted to obtain information on demographics, clinical care, previous diagnoses, and validated clinical measures. We present the trajectory of pain in this population with treatment of GD. Recognition and treatment of GD in youth with pain may improve pain outcomes.

Disclosure of Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Across Sexual and Gender Identities

Vie, 01/10/2021 - 10:01
OBJECTIVES

Evidence suggests that sexual minority (SM) and gender minority (GM) youth are more likely to experience self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITBs) than heterosexual and cisgender youth. A major barrier to identifying and treating SITBs is nondisclosure. In this study, we explored differences in SITB disclosure patterns between SM and GM youth and their heterosexual and cisgender peers. In this study, we further examined the association between discrimination experiences and SITB disclosure.

METHODS

Adolescents (N = 931) completed questionnaires assessing demographics, SITBs, disclosure history, disclosure barriers, future intentions to disclose SITBs, and discrimination history.

RESULTS

Few differences in SITB disclosure patterns emerged between SM and GM youth and heterosexual and cisgender youth (P > .05). SM and GM youth endorsed greater rates of fear of disclosure to and worrying parents, two parent-related barriers ( = 8.11, P = .017; = 7.25, P = .027). GM youth reported greater discrimination experiences than SM youth (F = 6.17, P = .002); discrimination experiences impacted their willingness to disclose future SITBs more so than their SM and heterosexual and cisgender peers (F = 11.58, P < .001). Among the full sample, more discrimination experiences were associated with lower previous disclosure honesty to therapists and pediatricians (r = –0.09 to –0.10, P < .05). Among SM and GM youth, discrimination experiences were associated with lesser odds of disclosing suicide attempts in the future (r = –0.12, P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS

Minority stress experiences may interfere with SITB disclosure, particularly among GM youth. Targeted interventions should be considered to reduce minority stress and support disclosure.

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